EU to Send Lethal Weapons to Niger and Somalia to Counter Security Threats"

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LONDON (GO) - The European Union has announced its intention to send lethal weapons to African partners Niger and Somalia as part of a broader strategy to counter security threats in the region. The move, which is expected to be adopted soon, represents a significant shift in the EU's foreign policy approach and underscores the growing importance of Africa in global security considerations.

Speaking at the Schuman Security and Defense Forum in Brussels, the EU's foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell, highlighted the changing nature of the security landscape in Europe and beyond. He emphasized the need for the EU to take a more proactive approach to security challenges, including by providing lethal support to partner countries facing security threats.

Borrell noted that the EU's response to the war in Ukraine had helped to reshape its security and defense agenda. He also highlighted the role of the European Peace Facility (EPF) in supporting peace operations in Africa and other parts of the world. The EPF, he said, had been crucial in responding to Russia's war in Ukraine but was also a "global instrument" that could be used to support partners in Africa and beyond.

The decision to provide lethal weapons to Niger and Somalia reflects the growing concern over security threats in these countries. Both countries have been grappling with a range of security challenges, including terrorism, organized crime, and political instability. The provision of lethal support is seen as a way to help these countries address these challenges more effectively.

The move has been welcomed by some security experts who argue that the EU needs to take a more proactive role in addressing security challenges in Africa. They argue that providing lethal support to partner countries is an important part of this effort, as it can help to build the capacity of these countries to deal with security threats on their own.

However, others have raised concerns about the potential risks involved in providing lethal support to partner countries. They argue that this could lead to unintended consequences, including the escalation of violence and the exacerbation of political instability. They also warn that providing lethal support could lead to the EU being dragged into conflicts that it is not prepared for.

Overall, the decision to provide lethal support to Niger and Somalia marks a significant shift in the EU's foreign policy approach. It reflects the growing importance of Africa in global security considerations and highlights the need for the EU to take a more proactive role in addressing security challenges in the region. However, the move is not without risks, and it remains to be seen how effective it will be in helping to build the capacity of partner countries to deal with security threats on their own.

GAROWE ONLINE 

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